Local Heros

Avery D. Andrews

Avery D. Andrews (April 4, 1864 – April 19, 1959) was an officer in the United States Army and a corporate attorney and executive. He was most prominent for his service as a brigadier general on the staff of the American Expeditionary Forces headquarters during World War I.

A native New York state’s North Country, Andrews graduated from the United States Military Academy in 1886, and was a classmate of John J. Pershing. He served as an artillery officer, and was appointed aide-de-camp to John Schofield, whose daughter he married in 1888. After graduating with law degrees from Columbian University and New York Law School, Andrews resigned from the army and became a successful corporate attorney and executive in New York City. He returned to the army for the Spanish–American War, and served as Adjutant General of New York during the governorship of Theodore Roosevelt.

Andrews again returned to the army for World War I; he attained the rank of brigadier general, and his service culminated with assignment as Assistant Chief of Staff for Personnel (C-1) on the headquarters staff of the American Expeditionary Forces. After the war, Andrews remained a brigadier general in the Organized Reserve Corps until retiring in 1926. He practiced law until retiring to Florida in 1943.

In 1934, Andrews published a Pershing biography. He died in Florida in 1959, and was buried at Arlington National Cemetery.

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William G. Bissell

William G. Bissell was born at Massena, St. Lawrence County, New York, September 18, 1857. In the spring of 1866 his parents removed to Wisconsin, settling on the farm near Lodi , Columbia county. He received his education in the public schools and at Albion academy. His occupation was that of a farmer and traveling salesman until 1896, when he engaged in the business of general merchandising at Lodi. Mr. Bissell is a republican who has always had a deep interest in the welfare of his party, but he had no opportunity to represent it in an official way until he located himself permanently as a merchant. In the fall of 1898 he was nominated for the state senate by the Republicans of the Twenty-seventh district, comprising Columbia and Sauk counties, and elected over Edmund S. Baker, the candidate of the democrats and James M. Blachly, the candidate of the Prohibitionists. Mr. Bissell served on the committees on state affairs, manufacturers and agriculture of the senate of 1899, and also represented his district on the floor of the senate in a manner that commanded the respect and attention of his colleagues.

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Aaron Bogosian

Aaron Bogosian was an American former professional ice hockey player. He most notably played with the Springfield Falcons and the Peoria Rivermen of the American Hockey League (AHL).

Bogosian attended St. Lawrence University where he played college hockey with the NCAA Division I St. Lawrence Saints men’s ice hockey team, scoring 79 points in 142 career games.[1]

On March 17, 2011, the Springfield Falcons of the AHL signed Bogosian to an amateur tryout agreement,[1] and he was subsequently signed to a standard American Hockey League contract for the 2011–12 AHL season.His brother is Zach Bogosian, defenseman for the Buffalo Sabres.[2]

On August 28, 2014, Bogosian opted to end his professional career.[3] After retiring, he was a volunteer assistant coach with the 2014 NCAA Division I College Hockey champions, the Union College Dutchmen.

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Zachary M. Bogosian

Zachary M. Bogosian (born July 15, 1990) is an American professional ice hockey defenseman, an alternate captain for the Buffalo Sabres. Bogosian was regarded as a complete, physical defenseman who could contribute on both offense and defense; he was rated as one of the top players heading into the 2008 NHL Entry Draft, where the Atlanta Thrashers selected him third overall. Bogosian first played in an international tournament when he joined the American national team at the 2009 IIHF World Championship.

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Gary Danko

Gary Danko is an American chef. He combines French, Mediterranean, and American styles into his cooking. He is best known for his eponymous restaurant in San Francisco, California. Danko was born in Massena, New York, his father was a Hungarian immigrant. His grandmother was Jewish and he grew up with Hungarian cooking with Jewish overtones.

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James Joseph Deshaies

James Joseph Deshaies (born June 23, 1960), also known as “JD”, is a former left-handed starting pitcher in Major League Baseball and currently a color analyst with the Chicago Cubs along with Len Kasper. Deshaies made his MLB debut with the New York Yankees on August 7, 1984. He set a milestone in his debut by being the 1,000th person to play an official game for the New York Yankees. He was the losing pitcher that day, after giving up four earned runs in four innings pitched in a 6–3 loss to the Chicago White Sox. Six days later, he lasted three innings in a no decision start against the Cleveland Indians. Those would be the only two appearances for the New York Yankees, who traded him to the Houston Astros on September 15, 1985, for Joe Niekro.

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Michael Ray Hurlbut

Michael Ray Hurlbut (born July 10, 1966 in Massena, New York) is a retired American professional ice hockey defenseman. He was drafted by the New York Rangers in the 1988 NHL Supplemental Draft. He currently serves as the associate head coach of the St. Lawrence UniversityMen’s Hockey program. In 1985, he joined the St. Lawrence UniversitySkating Saints Division I Men’s Ice Hockey Program. He was recruited from the Northwood School in Lake Placid, New York. While Hurlbut was at St. Lawrence, he was a First Team All-American, as well as a First Team All ECAC. He is widely considered to be one of the best defensemen to ever play hockey for St. Lawrence.

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John Alexander "Bid" McPhee

John Alexander “Bid” McPhee (November 1, 1859 – January 3, 1943) was an American 19th-century Major League Baseball second baseman. He played 18 seasons in the majors, from 1882 until 1899, all for the Cincinnati Reds franchise. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2000. Known more for his fielding than his hitting, McPhee was the last second baseman to play without a glove. Born in Massena, New York, McPhee broke into professional baseball in 1877 as a catcher with the Davenport Brown Stockings of the Northwestern League.[2] He played for Davenport for three seasons, shifting to second base during the 1879season.[2] After not playing baseball in 1880, he joined an independent team in Akron, Ohio in 1881.[2] Before the 1882 season, he signed a contract to play for the Cincinnati Red Stockings, a team in the newly formed American Association.

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